Javascript must be enabled in the security or content
settings of your browser for this site to work properly

To learn more about cookies search for HTTP cookie at wikipedia.com





Click here for information about DIGITALFIRE Corporation
Home | Support | Education 
About | Privacy | Search | Reference Database | Log in 

Conquer the Glaze Dragon With Digitalfire INSIGHT Glaze Chemistry Software

Install it on your PC

Focused on ceramic glaze chemistry calculations.

Download: Windows (2014-8d), OSX (2014-8d), Linux (2014-8d)


Test, Document, Learn, Repeat in your account at insight-live.com

Use it online. The next step.

Nothing to download or install. Revolutionary!


Tony Hansen's Thousand-Post TimeLine

I am the creator of Digitalfire Insight, Digitalfire.com and Insight-live.com. ... more

   All

The foot ring on the left is plucking, the right one is not. Why?

These are translucent porcelains, they are vitreous. The firing is to cone 10. The one on the left is a cone 6 body, and, while it survives to cone 10 it does warp. But this problem is fairly serious, making it very difficult to get a good foot ring. The other, which has only slight plucking is also ... more

Monday 6th July 2015

Plucking on a vitreous porcelain at cone 6

The mug on the left is made from a whiteware body (Plainsman M370), the one on the right is a highly vitreous translucent one (Plainsman Polar Ice). Both have been over-fired slightly. The Polar Ice mug has stuck to the shelf somewhat, taking chips out of the base (a fault called Plucking). If the shelf had been dusted with alumina or sand this would not have happened.

Monday 6th July 2015

A super glassy ultra-clear brilliantly glossy cone 6 clear base glaze? Yes!

I am comparing 6 well known cone 6 fluid melt base glazes and have found some surprising things. The top row are 10 gram balls of each melted down onto a tile to demonstrate melt fluidity and bubble populations. Second, third, fourth rows show them on porcelain, buff, brown stonewares. The first ... more

Thursday 2nd July 2015

Cone 04 terra cotta cross section close-up with glaze

The glaze is well melted, but the interfacial zone with the body is very narrow. It is basically just stuck on the surface. The body is not developing any clearly visible glassy phases as does porcelain and stoneware, so not surprisingly, its strength is much lower than vitrified clay bodies at ... more

Thursday 2nd July 2015

A cure for long-time low and medium fire Gerstley Borate sufferers!

These are various different terra cotta clays fired to cone 04 (also a low fire white-buff fritted stoneware) with a recipe I formulated to source the same chemistry as the popular Worthington clear, but sourcing the B2O3 from Ulexite and a frit instead of Gerstley Borate. All pieces are fired with ... more

Wednesday 24th June 2015

Why would a glaze turn into a jelly like this?

This is one of the things Gerstley Borate does to your glazes. Stir this and you might have 2 seconds to dip something before it turns to jelly again (this was even deflocculated with Darvan and it was OK yesterday). It has a low specific gravity (a high water content) and will dries very slowly on ... more

Wednesday 24th June 2015

Switching copper carbonate for copper oxide in a fluid glaze

The top samples are 10 gram balls melted down onto porcelain tiles at cone 6 (this is a high melt fluidity glaze). These balls demonstrate melt mobility and susceptibility to bubbling but also color (notice how washed out the color is for thin layers on the bottom two tiles). Both have the same ... more

Wednesday 24th June 2015

What material makes the tiny bubbles? The big bubbles?

These are two 10 gram balls of Worthington Clear glaze fired at cone 03 on terra cotta tiles (55 Gerstley Borate, 30 kaolin, 20 silica). On the left it contains raw kaolin, on the right calcined kaolin. The clouds of finer bubbles (on the left) are gone from the glaze on the right. That means the ... more

Tuesday 23rd June 2015

What is the secret of that extra cone 04 gloss on the right?

These glazes have the same recipe (a version of Worthington Clear sourcing B2O3 from Ulexite instead of Gerstley borate). While the one on the left is OK, the one on the right is great! Why? It has 10% added lead bisilicate frit. In North America we gasp at the use of lead and look with derision at ... more

Tuesday 23rd June 2015

Do your functional glazes do this? Fix them. Now.

These cone 6 porcelain mugs have glossy liner glazes and matte outers: VC71 (left) crazes, G2934 does not (it is highlighted using a felt marker and solvent). Crazing, while appropriate on non-functional ware, is unsanitary and severely weakens the ware (up to 300%). If your ware develops this your ... more

Friday 19th June 2015


These posts are actually pictures referenced on pages in The Digitalfire Reference Database, thousands of pages of explaining things you need to know to formulate, adjust and troubleshoot traditional ceramic bodies and glazes. It is organized as: Oxides, minerals, materials, recipes, articles, glossary, hazards, library, MDTs for INSIGHT, pictures, properties, firing schedules, significant temperatures, tests and troubleshooting. Level 2 desktop INSIGHT and Insight-Live both interact with it.

Sign In or Register

Is your glaze problem related to it's chemistry? Ask Us!

Email address

Subject

Name

Message

Enter this code

Prove you are human

What people say about digitalfire.com

  • Your attention to the people has been allways great, as its your software, thanks for the support.
  • Also, as a side note, this website is an excellent resource and I appreciate the fact that all this info is available on the web! Not only that, but I have found the information to be accurate, dependable and thorough, which is difficult to find anywhere.
Click here to see all 186

DigitalFire Logo

1 - 530 Allowance Ave SE, Medicine Hat, Alberta Canada T1A 3E3
Answering Machine: (406) 662-0136, FAX: (403) 527-7508
Privacy Policy